‘The Food For Every Mouth’ is a play written by one of the pioneers of Egyptian drama, Tawfiq al-Hakim. In the play, a middle-aged couple are outraged when their upstairs neighhour uses too much water to wash her floor and the water leaks down, causing a stain on their ceiling. While they are waiting for the painter to fix it, however, they start to see images in the stain, which form a group of two women and a man. The figures then start speaking and before long, the couple are entranced by the drama enacted by these characters. In the strange ceiling-stain drama, a daughter, Nadia, accuses her mother of killing their father in order to marry her cousin, his doctor. In the following speech, Nadia tells her brother Tarek everything, in front of her aghast mother…

 

Since our father’s death I have been waiting for this moment to tell you of what happened because it wasn’t convenient to do so while you were very busy in school.[To her mother] You never loved our father but you loved his money until Dr. Mamdouh inherited a big fortune from his wife. Then his love revived in your heart. Soon after, our father became sick and you sent for your doctor and lover and then my father’s death  or more accurately his killing took place.

[…] The death certificate –  who wrote it?? We won’t mention about the death certificate! But let’s talk about the injection that caused his death. [to Tarek] Ask her who gave him the injection! [To her mother] Your doctor and lover!  Ask her why she didn’t hire my father a nurse?[…] You did not hire a nurse so she wouldn’t know what you were doing.[…] It was not the penicillin injection that killed my father! It was an air injection in the vein! I heard them talking about it.[…] It is hard to prove because the plan was very well done  but father sensed there was something going on – and he asked me once to fetch another doctor. I told this mother and wife but she did not care.[…] It’s true that a crime like this should be properly investigated.[…] But I have the evidence of my feelings and my observations. I’ve lived in this house and I’ve seen strange things that confirm all my suspicions. Tarek, it’s up to you whether or not to believe the evidence of my feelings.[…] Yes … the evidence of my feelings! And I know Tarek will be able to understand me because he feels what I feel, don’t you, Tarek? […] I am sorry to cause all this trouble. But it was my duty to tell you.