Marguerite is a French courtesan who the young Armand has fallen madly in love with. Consumed with jealousy because of her lovers, Armand launches into a roller coaster of emotion in which he punishes her, then begs for her forgiveness, insults her and then showers her with love. This speech is an example of how Armand’s feelings for Marguerite dart between bitterness as adoration…

You will wed him because you are a mercenary and heartless fiend, prepared to sell your heart to the highest bidder, because you lacked the courage boldly to face the poverty, which with me, you feared would be your portion; because, in short, the man whom you had sworn you loved, was valueless—when placed beside the horses of your carriage, and the diamonds about your neck.[…]

Listen to me, Marguerite; I am mad—my brain is on fire—fever is in my veins—there is nothing of which I may not now be capable. I thought it was by hatred I was driven towards you; I now know that it was love, invincible, irresistible! A love, in yielding to which (after all that has passed) I blush with shame, and despise my own folly and my weakness. Well, say but that you love me still, that dazzled for a moment by De Varville’s wealth, you now repent your cruelty towards me; say but that, and together will we quit Paris—to-morrow you shall be my wife, and if the devotion of a heart whose every fibre throbs with adoration can make you happy, oh, then, Marguerite, felicity will indeed be thine.