Sophies’ parents, George and Honour, have recently broken up after 32 years of marriage. George left Honour for Claudia, who is only a couple of years older than his daughter. Sophie has asked Claudia to meet her, and Claudia has implied that there was another side to the marriage. But Sophie drew great comfort from her parents’ togetherness. In this speech she struggles to explain this to Claudia and tries to articulate how lost and inadequate she  now feels…

You’re so – you’re so clear. You seem so clear about things. Whereas I’m – I’m so – I can never say what I’m – even to myself, I’m so inarticulate. (Beat.) And where there were words there is now just – just this feeling of – of impossibility. That everything is – there’s no way through it – (Beat.) I used to feel  that way when I was very small. That same feeling. Not a childish feeling – well, maybe. As if I was choking on – as if life was coming down on me and I couldn’t see my way through it. What does a child who has everything suffer from? Who could name it? I can’t. I can’t. (Breaking.) But it was – a sort of – I used to see it in my head as jungle. Around me. Surrounding me. Some darkness growing, something – organic, alive – and the only thing that kept me – kept me – here – was the picture of Honor and George. Silly. (Beat.) Because I’m old now and I shouldn’t remember that any more. Lying in bed and feeling that they were there: outside the room in all their – their warmth, their – a kind of charm to them. Maybe you’re right and it was – not so simple as it looked, but they gave such a strong sense of – love for each other and inside that – I felt – I felt loved. And since I’ve gotten older I don’t feel – (Weeping.) I feel as if all that – all the – everything that saved me has fallen from me and you know, I’m not a child anymore. No. I’m not a kid any more. But I still feel – I need – I need..(Beat.) I wish – I wish I was more – Like you. Like you.