Charity has just revealed herself to be a girl, having posed as a boy in a gang up until now. The play is set in an abtract dimension where the characters walk on red hot coals and gang politics dominate. In this speech, charity tells her brother Aaron about an experience that stirred her deeply, although she does not understand why…

I was in a car at the traffic lights and I saw across the other side of the road a baby fox. […] It had run out from someone’s front garden and it was so tiny it could hardly walk on its little legs. […] But it bounded across the pavement like Bambi and ran into the road just as the lights changed and the car in front took off. […] And my heart, like, jumped into my throat all of a sudden but the car stopped and I thought, ‘Thank God, it’s stopped just in time,’ and I was waiting for it to run out the other side but I couldn’t see it and then the car in front swerved and drove around it and I could see that it was still running, the baby fox, but running on its side with his head now facing its tail and blood coming from its mouth with these wild, wild eyes. And though I only saw it for a second I can’t stop seeing the image in my mind. And when we drove past again on the way back it had gone, but there was a stain on the tarmac, like someone had been sick. […] The other day I watched a grown man get punched in the face til he was basically dead, and the only thing I can’t get out of my mind is a baby fox that didn’t do nothing but run out into the road. I keep seeing it, running, you know, on its side, but it’s not the running, it’s not its twisted spine, it’s the eyes, Aaron, cos even though it was dying, even though its life was beaten out of it, its eyes…its eyes were on fire.