This speech is spoken by the Moon, who is often characterized as a pale faced woodcutter in the forest where an illicit couple are hiding. Described by the first woodcutter as ‘the moon of sharp knives’, the purpose of this moon is strip away all darkness so that the couple are exposed and forced into facing their punishment of death, warming the cold and lonely moon with their blood…

White swan in the river, the eye of cathedrals, false dawn in the leaves, am I. They cannot hide! Who can escape? Who sobs in the valley’s tangle? The moon leaves a knife behind in the air, a lead-coloured trap that seeks blood’s cry. Let me in! I come frozen through walls and windows! Open roofs and breasts where I can be warmed! I’m chilled! My ashes of somnolent metals seek the crown of the fire among streets and mountains. But I bring the snow to their shoulders of jasper, and I flood, cold and harsh, the depths of the lakes. But this night my cheeks will be stained with red blood, and the reeds clustered in wide swathes of air. I have no shadow, nowhere they can hide! Let me enter a breast where I can be warmed!

A heart of my own! Burning! Spilling itself on the hills of my breast; Let me come in! Oh, let me! (To the branches) No shadow. My rays must shine everywhere, and in dark of the trees spread a rumour of dawn, so my cheeks this night will be stained with red blood, and the reeds clustered in wide swathes of air. Who’s that hiding! Speak out! No! There’s no escape!

 

(The Moon vanishes among the trees and leaves the scene to its gloom.)